Current Lab Members

    

Katerina Rnic, graduate student

Email:  katerina.rnic@gmail.com

Graduate studies: PhD III (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.A. (Hons.) Psychology, Queen's University

My research focuses on life events and stress generation in unipolar depression. My work has examined how cognitive vulnerabilities, personality, and maladaptive behaviours predispose individuals to generate stress over time, and how this process maintains or exacerbates depression. I am also interested in interpersonal rejection/ostracism, a highly depressogenic stressor. I am studying how depressive symptoms and cognitive and behavioural vulnerabilities to depression contribute to prolonged responses to rejection, as well as how the experience of social rejection influences subsequent self-relevant and social cognitive processing. Currently, I am also involved in projects examining treatment outcomes and moderators of CBT for depression and anxiety in cancer patients, theory of mind in depressed individuals with a history of maltreatment, and cognitive models of suicidal thinking and behaviour.

Katerina Rnic's CV

    

Monica Tomlinson, graduate student

Email:  mtomlin5@uwo.ca

Graduate studies: PhD II (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.A. (Hons.) Psychology & English, McGill University

Monica Tomlinson completed her B.A. in Psychology and English at McGill University in 2011. In 2012, Monica was employed as a full-time researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal, QC, with Dr. Eduardo Chachamovich. Her research team conducted studies on the risk factors for suicide among Inuit populations in Nunavut. Her experiences working with individuals suffering from mental disorders in Canada’s Arctic led her to pursue graduate training in clinical psychology. Monica completed her MSc. in clinical psychology at The University of Western Ontario (UWO) in 2015 with Dr. Peter Hoaken and is currently completing her PhD in clinical psychology at UWO with Dr. David Dozois. She is currently pursuing two programs of research. For the last three years, Monica has been working collaboratively with the Southwest Centre for Forensic Mental Health care developing and evaluating effective and sustainable rehabilitation programs for individuals who suffer from severe mental disorders and who have come in contact with the criminal justice system. Since 2016, Monica has also pursued research projects related to better understanding how alcohol contributes to the onset and maintenance of depression.

monicatomlinson.com               Monica Tomlinson's CV

    

Daniel Machado, graduate student

Email:  d.machado23@gmail.com

Graduate studies: PhD I (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.A. (Hons.) Psychology, University of Waterloo

Daniel is a 2nd year Masters student in the Dozois lab. Daniel graduated from the University of Waterloo with a B.A. in Honours Psychology. His honours thesis, completed under the supervision of Dr. Joanne Wood, focused on how communication context (online vs face-to-face) affected expressivity as a function of self-esteem and agreeableness. He also worked as a research assistant in Dr. Erik Woody's lab, contributing to a project that examined the effects of interpersonal complementarity on therapeutic outcome. Daniel is currently completing his Master's thesis, which is a longitudinal study investigating the predictors of relapse in unipolar depression. The purpose of this project is to examine self-schema stability and the predictive validity of its content and structure over time, and how this confers risk for depressive relapse, as well as to test potential mediating and moderating mechanisms.

Daniel Machado's CV

    

Lindsay Szota, graduate student

Email:  lszota@uwo.ca

Graduate studies: M.Sc. II (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.Sc. (Hons.) Psychology, University of Western Ontario

Lindsay is a 1st year Masters student in the Breaking Sad lab. Lindsay graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a B.Sc., Honours Specialization in Psychology. Under the supervision of Dr. David Dozois, her honours thesis examined the mechanisms by which early maladaptive schemas relate to depressive symptomatology. She also worked as a research assistant at the Anxiety Treatment & Research Clinic under the supervision of Dr. Randi McCabe, as a site-coordinator for a project examining the efficacy of exercise in treating OCD. Lindsay is currently completing her Master’s thesis examining cognitive reactivity to negative mood primes as a function of schema structure. The purpose of this research is to examine how schema structure confers risk for depression, and to compare the stability of cognitive organization and processing.

    

Jesse Lee Wilde, graduate student

Email:  jwilde3@uwo.ca

Graduate studies: M.Sc. II (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.Sc. (Hons.) Psychology, University of Toronto, 2014

Jesse Lee completed her B.Sc. (Hons.) at the University of Toronto in 2014 with a Research Specialization in Psychology. Under the supervision of Dr. Geoff MacDonald, her honours thesis examined how attachment styles influence individuals’ perceptions of, and interest in, potential romantic partners. In 2015, she worked as a clinical research coordinator to Dr. Neil Rector at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto. In her time there, Jesse Lee was involved in several projects, including a study examining post-partum anxiety and mood disorders, as well as a clinical trial examining treatment outcomes for OCD. Jesse Lee is primarily interested in understanding how underlying schemas influence interpersonal processes in depression, particularly within the context of close relationships. For her Master’s thesis, she will be examining how the organization of one’s partner-schema predicts relationship functioning in depressed individuals.

Jesse Lee Wilde's CV

    

Jennifer Gillies, graduate student

Email:  jgilli24@uwo.ca

Graduate studies: M.Sc. I (in progress) Clinical Psychology, Western University

Undergraduate degree: B.Sc. (Hons.) Psychology, Queen's University, 2014

Jennifer is a first-year Masters student in the Dozois lab. In 2014, she graduated from Queen’s University with a B.A. (Hons.) in Psychology. Her honours thesis, completed under the supervision of Dr. Kate Harkness in the Mood Research Lab, investigated the associations among parental history of depression, parenting style, and clinical profile in depressed adolescents and adults. Under the supervision of Dr. Linda Booij, Jennifer also conducted research at Queen’s on the impact of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on brain function and DNA methylation in depressed adolescents. After graduating, Jennifer continued to work in the Mood Research Lab as the research coordinator for a project investigating individual differences in the causes of depression at the neurobiological and psychosocial levels. Jennifer is particularly interested in research that furthers our understanding of the etiology, maintenance, prevention, and treatment of depression.

    

Rachel Goldberg, honours student

Rachel is a fourth year honours thesis student at Western University completing her Honours Specialization in Psychology, Bachelor of Science. She is involved in ongoing research projects at Southwest Centre for Forensic Mental Health, examining the effects of Dialectical Behavioural Therapy within a forensic psychiatric population. For her honours thesis, Rachel is studying the cognitive organization of self-schemas in depressed vs. non-depressed participants and how this predicts negative biases in encoding and recall of negative information.